Originally Posted By thebutterflysgrave

tulililli:

captainkirkmccoy:

chaffeebicknell:

thebutterflysgrave:

am I sick from anxiety or am I actually physically ill? a memoir by me

am i lazy or horribly depressed: the sequel

does everyone hate me or am I just very insecure: the completion of the trilogy

And the riveting companion anthology of short stories: Am I Actually Getting Better or am I Ignoring My Problems

(via zacharykahlo)

Originally Posted By holdmypurse

kyssthis16:

Remember when Mitt Romney spoke at the NAACP National Convention

LEGENDARY

(Source: holdmypurse, via chauvinistsushi)

There’s a mumps outbreak on my campus!

the sponsored posts finally drove me to tumblr savior

think of how irritating 4/20 will be on 4/20/2040

i wrote a really long facebook comment on trigger warnings and wanted to put it here

The questions you are asking are hard questions that need to be answered, especially who deserves to avoid their trigger and how can trigger warnings be used to cover over larger issues of mental health broadly. One question I have that purely comes from my exposure online and that may be totally wrong is something like, How do trigger warnings come from a particularly white, privileged online discourse? This is a real problem in disability activism in general—access to treatment and attempts to create accessibility are always always marked by privilege. But I don’t really see that kind of critique coming from many of the writers who are so strongly opposed to trigger warnings. Instead it seems to boil down to questions like “Should people with mental illness be in school?” or “How are triggered people behaving badly?” 

Who trigger warnings potentially mark in a classroom space is a practical problem, too. I think about that when trying to grapple with names and pronouns in classroom spaces. Even though I am trans and deeply value students’ self-identification, I don’t ask for preferred gender pronouns when we’re doing introductions because I feel like they mark and call attention to the individual trans people in my classes. I try to get at pronouns in different ways. But it’s still not a good thing to avoid it all together…long story short I think there are a lot of similarities.

I think part of the issue is that there is a difference between a writer marking his or her text and a reader marking another person’s text. In online spaces, writers mark their own texts with trigger warnings as a heads up to their long-term readers because they know that their audience has particular needs. Often writing marked with a trigger warning is accordingly revealing, graphic, and personal. I find they don’t cover over difficult discourse and instead offer people ways to engage with it on their own terms.

In the weirdly unspecific “college classroom” that has been posited in many of these articles online, trigger warnings couldn’t follow this pattern because the original writer is generally not present to mark their content for a particular audience (except in the writing classroom).

I prefer to think of trigger warnings as a “heads up” rather than a “you can avoid this reading/film.” I think a lot of teachers are already practicing a kind of “trigger warning” when they give their students notice that the book they are reading is about suicide or rape. Knowing about that going in, for me at least, is a big help. I also think they are not meant to keep you from teaching certain kinds of content—in fact they could function to help faciliate discussion around having more intense, emotionally challenging content in the classroom

Talking about it with others has really made me think about the role of reading in the classroom and how much control we have over students doing the reading, too…but I’m still wrapping my head around it.

To take a stab at it: part of the underlying issue links up with the classic divide between the role of writing and reading in the classroom. Students want to read in college classrooms in the way that they write online. Do we as English teachers want to approach that as a problem or do we want to work with it, understand it, and see where it goes?

Originally Posted By videohall

tanacetum-vulgare:

sweetpeche:

reblog for easter

oh my god i forgot about this. 

(Source: videohall)

Originally Posted By slightly-oblivvyous

pizza-poops:

slightly-oblivvyous:

One of my dear friends has been struggling with a string of low spoons days lately, which inspired me to create this spoons meter so they could quickly and wordlessly convey how they were feeling that day. It works on a scale of 0 to 5, where five spoons means: “Hey, I’m feeling good! Let’s go out and see people and kick ass and crush the patriarchy!” and zero spoons means: “Spoon levels critically low - DO NOT ENGAGE”
I figured this might be useful for other spoonies struggling with chronic illness or disability, so I’m making it freely available! The meter itself is small enough to fit nicely in a blog description or anywhere else you may wish to conspicuously display your current spoons level.

You can download the full set here. It’s totally free to use (although, of course, credit and a note to let me know would be lovely!) Even if you don’t need this, please consider reblogging in case one of your followers might find it useful.
May all your spoons be polished and your silverware drawer be full! =3

Thank you so, so much for making this. 

pizza-poops:

slightly-oblivvyous:

One of my dear friends has been struggling with a string of low spoons days lately, which inspired me to create this spoons meter so they could quickly and wordlessly convey how they were feeling that day. It works on a scale of 0 to 5, where five spoons means: “Hey, I’m feeling good! Let’s go out and see people and kick ass and crush the patriarchy!” and zero spoons means: “Spoon levels critically low - DO NOT ENGAGE”

I figured this might be useful for other spoonies struggling with chronic illness or disability, so I’m making it freely available! The meter itself is small enough to fit nicely in a blog description or anywhere else you may wish to conspicuously display your current spoons level.

You can download the full set here. It’s totally free to use (although, of course, credit and a note to let me know would be lovely!) Even if you don’t need this, please consider reblogging in case one of your followers might find it useful.

May all your spoons be polished and your silverware drawer be full! =3

Thank you so, so much for making this. 

(via youarenotyou)

Originally Posted By pikachutherabbit

When hospitalization results in residential suspension, when displaying signs of mental illness results in threats of disciplinary action, when having issues with self-harm means that I cannot be allowed to live with the sane folk, it’s easy to understand why few students are open about their struggles with mental health.

Originally Posted By quadlutz

miss-zarves:

quadlutz:

image

if you owned this book as a kid and you didn’t have a huge crush on sandy and dennys i don’t understand you tbh

this book was so sexual??? like to this day when i think of “books that made me feel weirdly naughty as a kid” this is the first one i think of. for the record there is no actual sex in it. or no scenes thereof anyway

Originally Posted By halfsquaretriangles

halfsquaretriangles:

SARAH SCHULMAN: In my view, if a violated person acts out by hurting others, they are not really “survivors.” So, I used both terms. In my book TIES THAT BIND: Familial Homophobia and Its Consequences, I actively use the word “victim” to define people on the receiving end of familial homophobia and provide a long explanation – so I don’t have the same ideology about that word that you do.

I am not calling people “objects” in a dehumanizing way. I’m saying that if you act out on me, I am the object of your misplaced rage. It’s a grammatical term.

"act out" means "ask literally anyone for literally any consideration" here.

Originally Posted By halfsquaretriangles

missvoltairine:

halfsquaretriangles:

CACONRAD: I have been thinking about PTSD as a disability. I’ll bring up class again. Who can afford to get their needs met with proper attention? Who is simply being doped up by the doctor because there’s not enough money for their time? I’m not saying this is an answer, I’m saying class should be an additional consideration. I’ve been successful in treating my own PTSD with various alternative, inexpensive healing practices, from co-counseling to Reiki, and the amazing TRE (Trauma Releasing Exercises). In the end whether we consider PTSD a disability or not I’m not seeing how trigger warnings is the answer.

wh?????

"as someone who has been able to access treatments that worked for me for my PTSD, I acknowledge that some people can’t afford mental health treatment, but still don’t think they deserve accommodations because ????"

feeling broken today, why am i continuing to read the entropy roundtable.

Originally Posted By dorkly

I met my wife at a Star Trek convention. She was study abroad from France and spoke little English, and I didn’t know a lick of French. So, for the first few months of our relationship, we communicated by speaking Klingon.

Hear more tales of nerdery in this week’s Pwn Up! (via dorkly)

Okay I’m not even a Star Trek fan but that’s beautiful.

(via tchy)

THIS IS SO DARLING I LOVE IT TREK NERD PERFECTION

(via jennifergearing)

I am a Star Trek fan (and one who knows little smidgens of Klingon), and yes. This is delightful.

(via kiriamaya)

The international language of love.

(via blue-author)

(via youarenotyou)

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